Skip Navigation

May-June 2017

Print
Email
ResizeResize Text: Original Large XLarge

Museum Notes

NEWS FROM UPPER MICHIGAN

The A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum, in Houghton, Michigan, has a well-established satellite exhibit program in place, considering the exhibits an extension of its outreach program. These mineral displays are located in several places in the state: at the Michigan Welcome Centers in Marquette and St. Ignace; the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Eddy Discovery Center near Chelsea; the C. C. Little Science Building at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor; the Michigan Tech Research Institute, also in Ann Arbor; the Keweenaw Convention & Visitors Bureau visitor center in Calumet; and the Copper Harbor Community Center. The exhibits serve to enhance the museum's reputation while educating people about minerals.

An example of the Seaman Museum's satellite exhibits, this one at the Michigan Welcome Center in St. Ignace.

An example of the Seaman Museum's satellite exhibits, this one at the Michigan Welcome Center in St. Ignace.

In other news, congratulations are due Dr. John Jaszczak, adjunct curator at the Seaman Museum, on having a new mineral, jaszczakite, named after him. (And if you think the mineral name is hard to pronounce, try spelling it!)

NEWS FROM LOWER MICHIGAN

Robert “Bob” Nowakowski is joining Cranbrook Institute of Science, in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, as an adjunct curator of minerals to help in a major revision of the one thousand specimens, tags, and subject areas in the Mineral Study Gallery, originally configured in 1996–97.

Robert Nowakowski, now adjunct curator at the Cranbrook Institute of Science.

Robert Nowakowski, now adjunct curator at the Cranbrook Institute of Science.

ALL 'ROUND BEST

The Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, in Hillsboro, Oregon, was awarded the 2016 Gold Medal Award for Best Attraction in Hillsboro and the Best Place to Take Kids. Readers of the Hillsboro Tribune newspaper made the selections and also voted for the Rice Museum to receive a bronze medal for Best Place to Volunteer and for Best Annual Event (for its Summer Festival the first weekend of August).

Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, an award-winning attraction. The 9,000-square-foot structure housing the museum is listed on the National Registry for Historic Homes based on its unique architectural style and the use of natural stone as well as native Oregon woodwork throughout.

Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, an award-winning attraction. The 9,000-square-foot structure housing the museum is listed on the National Registry for Historic Homes based on its unique architectural style and the use of natural stone as well as native Oregon woodwork throughout.

SPECIMENS DONATED

The Gemological Institute of America's (GIA) Museum, in Carlsbad, California, has acquired sixty-three ornamental minerals of exception size and quality through a generous donation by the family of Joel and Barbara Hauser. Many of the pieces are from localities with restricted access or that are no longer producing. Nearly fifty of these minerals are currently on display.

For more than sixty years, native Californian Joel Hauser pursued his hobby of collecting agates, geodes, ornamental minerals, and petrified wood. He was also a skilled lapidary, mastering the art of contour polishing. His family donated the collection's finest minerals to GIA in his memory.

AUGUST EVENTS

For those who like to plan ahead, the Ben E. Clement Mineral Museum, in Marion, Kentucky, in the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district, is offering the opportunity for eclipse watchers to visit the museum and its exhibits of world-class minerals and mining history before or after the event on 21 August. The total solar eclipse track passes through the fluorspar district with the longest time of 2 minutes and 41 seconds.

The museum will have fee digs for microminerals at the Hickory Cane mine (known for hemimorphite, cerussite, smithsonite, among others), the Eureka prospect (fluorite, sphalerite, calcite, smithsonite, greenockite, among others), and the Columbia mine (with its spectacular fluorescent minerals) on 18–20 August. Digs have a limited capacity, so reservations are required. See website www.clementmineralmuseum.org for details. 

In this Issue

Taylor & Francis Group

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group · 530 Walnut Street, Suite 850, Philadelphia, PA · 19106