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July-August 2017

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Letters

COLORADO INVITATION

The Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum (CSMGM) invites all those in town for the Denver Gem and Mineral Show (15–17 September) to attend our annual open house on 13 September, 6–9 P.M., the Wednesday evening preceding the show. Come enjoy our displays and visit with our Museum Advisory Council members, student aides, volunteers, and Friends of the CSMGM, and also browse our splendid gift shop. Once again we are offering mineral dealers, corporations, show organizers, and interested individuals the opportunity to help sponsor the event, for which they will receive special recognition in return for their kindness. (Please phone for details.)

Every year we strive to change 20 percent of our exhibits to make our museum more exciting for returning guests. As of this writing (early March), we have firm commitments from Fred Wilda, who has offered to loan us some of his favorite rough and cut cabachons, Jesse Fisher and Joan Kureczka with some of their worldwide fluorites, and Edna and Robert Whitmore with a display of cut and uncut gemstones, as well as specimens from our Hilja K. Herfurth Estate collection, and a display of gemstone impressionism in the form of intarsia jewelry objects created by Nicolai Medvedev (see photo). There will be other upgrades to our displays and surprises throughout the museum.

Examples of Nicolai Medvedev's fine gemstone intarsia on loan to the Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum from several sources.

Examples of Nicolai Medvedev's fine gemstone intarsia on loan to the Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum from several sources. Erica and Harold Van Pelt photo, courtesy Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum. 

As always, our gala offers free appetizers, a cash bar, and possibly another relaxing performance by the harmonious Colorado School of Mines String Quartet. We hope to see you here.

WULFENITE: ARIZONA'S STATE MINERAL

On 22 March 2017, Arizona Governor Doug Ducey signed House Bill 2092 into law, after a two-year campaign to have wulfenite become the state mineral.

Wulfenite and mimetite, 4.5 cm high, from the Rowley mine, Maricopa County, Arizona. Dick Morris specimen, Jeff Scovil photo.

Wulfenite and mimetite, 4.5 cm high, from the Rowley mine, Maricopa County, Arizona. Dick Morris specimen, Jeff Scovil photo.

The bill was re-introduced on 9 January 2017 after failing to gain traction in 2016. This time it successfully got through the Arizona Legislature by resounding votes of 57 to 1 in the House and 28 to 1 in the Senate, with the support of the bill's primary sponsor, Rep. Mark Finchem.

The key to passage of this legislation included: (1) educating state legislators; (2) phone calls/letters of support, including more than one thousand signatures of mineral collectors and curators from around the world; (3) photos of wulfenite; (4) two special cases of Arizona wulfenites exhibited during the 2016 and 2017 Tucson Gem and Mineral Show®; and (5) a final effort to urge signage of the bill by constituents.

Special thanks go to members of the Arizona Mineral Minions, the Mineral Enthusiasts of the Tucson Area (META), the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society, the Pinal Gem and Mineral Society, and the Mineralogical Society of Arizona, including student members who attended and were recognized for their support during the bill's introduction in the House of Representatives. 

 

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