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November-December 2016

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Museum Notes

MESOZOIC MAYHEM

In July Cranbrook Institute of Science, in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, opened a new 1,000-square-foot temporary display, Mesozoic Mayhem, in the museum's main lobby. Merging with the adjacent permanent exhibit, Dinosaurs to Birds, it was developed and installed as part of an internship program funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. Mesozoic Mayhem features new tyrannosaurs from southern Utah including a complete skeletal cast of a Teratophoneus and the skull of a Lythronax. Other themes are dinosaur-bird evolution with Deinonychus, a pack of rampaging velociraptors, and primitive birds; and the Cretaceous extinction with Triceratops, Tyrannosaurus rex, and a display of the K-Pg asteroid fall-out layer from southern Colorado. Mesozoic Mayhem complements the prehistoric predator theme of the traveling exhibit Megalodon, which is on display in the institute's traveling exhibit hall. Both exhibits run until 1 January 2017.

The skull of Teratophoneus curriei in Mesozoic Mayhem with the skeleton of Tyrannosaurus rex (Black Beauty) in the background at Cranbrook Institute of Science.

The skull of Teratophoneus curriei in Mesozoic Mayhem with the skeleton of Tyrannosaurus rex (Black Beauty) in the background at Cranbrook Institute of Science.

HOSTING SYMPOSIUM

The Cleveland Museum of Natural History will again be hosting the annual symposium of the Micromineral Society of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, this year being held 4–6 November. Julian Gray, executive director of the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals in Hillsboro, Oregon, will be the keynote speaker giving two programs. Also scheduled are workshops, short talks, and freebie tables. In addition, the Midwest Chapter of Friends of Mineralogy will hold a meeting in conjunction with the event. For further information, contact Janet Clifford at janet15clifford@gmail.

REOPENED

The recently reopened Lapworth Museum. The “Mineral Wall” display case runs the length of the hall.

 

The recently reopened Lapworth Museum. The “Mineral Wall” display case runs the length of the hall.                   

The Lapworthy Museum of Geology at the University of Birmingham, in Birmingham, United Kingdom, reopened in mid-June after an extensive £2.7-million redevelopment that took approximately two years. The museum now sports state-of-the-art galleries and a range of innovative and interactive exhibits, and it covers it all: minerals, rocks, fossils, volcanoes, earthquakes, and dinosaurs. It even has a café and retail area. Admission is free.

The recently reopened Lapworth Museum. An exterior view showing the new entrance.

The recently reopened Lapworth Museum. An exterior view showing the new entrance.                   

BEING RENOVATED

The Cincinnati Museum Center—which includes the Museum of Natural History and Science, the Children's Museum, and the Cincinnati History Museum, as well as the OMNIMAX Theater—recently began a two-year $212.7-million renovation project of the historic Union Terminal Building, home to the museum complex. Anyone wanting to visit during this time should first check the museum's website (www.cincymuseum.org) for a status update.

FOSSIL FIELD TRIP

This past summer the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art, in Elmhurst, Illinois, sponsored a bus trip to Vulcan quarry in Sycamore, Illinois. Lucky participants were able to collect Silurian and Ordovician period marine fossils in the quarry's shale and limestone. Included were brachiopods, cephalopods, corals, crinoids, and gastropods, among others.       

 

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