Skip Navigation

May-June 2013

Print
Email
ResizeResize Text: Original Large XLarge

Chips from the Quarry

THE KRÜGERHAUS: As promised in the March/April Museum Notes column, this issue carries the story of Krügerhaus, the newest mineral museum in Freiberg, Germany, already well known for its terra mineralia museum. If a visit to the Sainte-Marie Show is in your plans for this June, you might want to route your trip to include a tour of the quaint mining town of Freiberg and its mineral museums.

Andreas Massanek (center), mineral curator at terra mineralia and of the mineral collections of the TU Bergakademie Freiberg, explaining exhibits during the Krügerhaus's grand opening in October 2012.
Andreas Massanek (center), mineral curator at terra mineralia and of the mineral collections of the TU Bergakademie Freiberg, explaining exhibits during the Krügerhaus's grand opening in October 2012.

WHAT'S ON YOUR PLATE? Part 1 of Jeffrey Starr's just-for-fun article about specialty license plates appeared in the July/August 2011 issue; part 2 is in this issue. Now I ask you, after reading them, how could I resist purchasing a special-order plate, particularly when my state's license slogan is Ohio Rocks! followed by the website for the state's geological survey (OhioGeology.com). That's how I ended up with EDITOR on my license plate, and my husband, a calcite collector, with CACO3 on his.

Proceeds from the sale of the Ohio Rocks! plates benefit a new Earth Science Education and Outreach Fund, which will award a number of grants to earth science students at Ohio colleges and universities each year for research on Ohio's geology. Additionally, a portion of the proceeds is dedicated to providing educational outreach to Ohio's K–12 schools in support of earth science.

License plates that say it all!
License plates that say it all!

PSSST, WANNA SEE SOME PICTURES? He's come a long way—Jeff Scovil, that is. I well remember the Tucson Show, back in the early 1980s, when he stopped by the Rocks & Minerals subscription booth with a slim binder filled with colored photographs of minerals, hesitantly asking if we'd be interested in using any of them in the magazine. Some thirty-plus years later, he is well established in the mineral photography field, a field in which the Scovil name is synonymous with excellence. In those intervening years, his photos have appeared on more than 325 magazine covers worldwide (64 of them on Rocks & Minerals alone), dozens of show posters, book jackets, calendars, notecards, postcards, business cards, Christmas cards, even T-shirts and cups, and that's not including the countless magazine and journal articles that have been enhanced with his photography.

In this issue he presents his annual “unpublished favorites” from the previous year, those select photos that he especially prizes and that are published here for the first time.

Jeff Scovil's first cover photo on Rocks & Minerals (November/December 1984).
Jeff Scovil's first cover photo on Rocks & Minerals (November/December 1984).

RECOGNITION AWARDS: The annual February Tucson Show, the largest gathering of mineral collectors worldwide, is a most appropriate setting for presenting awards of excellence to deserving individuals for their contributions to some particular aspect of mineralogy. This year was no exception, with several individuals being so honored.

The Carnegie Mineralogical Award: Dr. George Robinson, curator of the A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum and professor of mineralogy at Michigan Technological University in Houghton, Michigan, was honored as recipient of the Carnegie Mineralogical Award for 2012. His selection was based on his service to the mineral community for more than four decades as earth science and mineralogy instructor at both the high school and university level, as curator at the Canadian Museum of Nature and later the Seaman Museum, and as a prolific author and lecturer, as well as on his availability to the professional and hobbyist alike. As in the past, the award was presented by Marc L. Wilson, curator of the Minerals Section of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, during the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show's Saturday evening banquet and program, this year held 16 February. It was accepted by Ted Bornhorst, director of the Seaman Museum, on behalf of Robinson, who was unable to attend. Robinson is the twenty-sixth winner of the annual award, which recognizes outstanding contributions in mineralogical preservation, conservation, and education that match the ideals advanced in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History's Hillman Hall of Minerals and Gems. Established in 1987, the award is underwritten by the Hillman Foundation. For background on Robinson and a recent photo, please see the Who's Who in Mineral Names column in this issue; he is also the coauthor of an article on pink Petoskey stones in this issue. Robinson plans to retire in June of this year. Nominations for the 2013 award can be directed to Marc Wilson (wilsonm@carnegiemnh.org).

The Pinch Medal: Adriana and Renato Pagano, of Milan, Italy, were selected as the 2013 recipients of the biennial Pinch Medal of the Mineralogical Association of Canada for their immense and sustained contributions to mineralogy over several decades. The medal was established to recognize such contributions to the advancement of mineralogy by members of the collector-dealer community; this marks the seventh time it has been awarded. Renato has often and freely used his considerable experience in specimen mineralogy and his wide network of international friends to support scientists and museum curators in their research and acquisition projects; he has also been instrumental in the study of new species and crystal structures. In addition, he has given selflessly to the scientific and hobby communities through sharing materials, providing lectures, writing and editing, and enhancing communications between people of all levels of mineral activity. His extensive collections of minerals, antique instruments, and mineral art are well known, as is his extensive mineral library, which he often makes available to scientists and collectors. The Paganos were both so-honored because they have been an inseparable team, supporting each other in their involvement with minerals. For an in-depth look at their contributions to mineralogy, see the Who's Who in Mineral Names column on the Paganos (and paganoite, their namesake mineral) in the September/October 2002 issue of Rocks & Minerals (pages 326–327). Dr. Kim Tait, of the Royal Ontario Museum, presented the medal during the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show's banquet and program.

Renato and Adriana Pagano, recipients of the Pinch Medal.
Renato and Adriana Pagano, recipients of the Pinch Medal.

The American Mineral Heritage Award: Wayne A. Thompson, of Phoenix, Arizona, was chosen to receive this year's American Mineral Heritage Award, established in 2012 by the Mineralogical Record to recognize a field collector whose personal discoveries in the Americas have contributed most significantly to the cumulative heritage of aesthetic and/or scientific mineral specimens preserved in museums and private collections worldwide. An underground field collector since childhood, Thompson is a veteran of nearly every important specimen-producing mine in Arizona. He established one of the first professional collecting companies (Southwestern Mineral Associates) that could sign contracts with large mining companies to recover specimens from operating mines. Not restricting himself to Arizona, he has also made important specimen discoveries in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and even Brazil and Mexico. These were not brief collecting trips but organized, well-equipped, professional operations that lasted for weeks or months and were often extremely productive. In addition, his book Ikons: Classics and Contemporary Masterpieces of Mineralogy (a supplement to the January/February 2007 issue of the Mineralogical Record) is itself a classic in the field of elite mineral collecting. The award was presented by Wendell E. Wilson, publisher and editor-in-chief of the Mineralogical Record, at the 10 February program at the Westward Look Show in Tucson. Nominations for the 2014 award can be sent to Gene Meieran (gene.meieran@att.net).

Wayne A. Thompson, recipient of the American Mineral Heritage Award.
Wayne A. Thompson, recipient of the American Mineral Heritage Award.

The Best Paper Award: The Friends of Mineralogy (FM) named Tom Rosemeyer as winner of the Best Paper in Rocks & Minerals for 2012 for his article titled “Copper-banded Agates from the Kearsarge Copper-bearing Amygdaloidal Lode, Houghton County, Michigan,” published in the July/August issue, pages 352–365. The announcement was made during the awards banquet and program at the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show. In addition to the Award of Merit given to the author, the magazine received a grant of $200 in his name. We thank FM for this significant annual recognition and congratulate Rosemeyer, who has been providing Rocks & Minerals with well-researched, well-written, and well-illustrated articles on Colorado and Upper Michigan since the 1980s. This is the third time he has been selected for the Best Paper Award of Merit.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: The Houston Gem and Mineral Society, in memory of Arthur E. Smith, and the Cincinnati Mineral Society underwrote color costs in the Connoisseur's Choice column; Maryanne and John Fender (Fender Natural Resources) did the same for the Museum Notes column. Donors to the Color Fund contributed toward color in the remaining articles. All are thanked for partnering with Rocks & Minerals to support color photography in each issue of the magazine.

In this Issue

Taylor & Francis Group

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group · 530 Walnut Street, Suite 850, Philadelphia, PA · 19106