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January-February 2011

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Chips from the Quarry: January/February 2011

Caption: Coloring book designed by Darryl Powell for distribution at the 2011 Tucson Show.

Caption: Coloring book designed by Darryl Powell for distribution at the 2011 Tucson Show.

ALMOST TIME FOR TUCSON: If going to the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show has long been on your bucket list, make this your year to go. Dates for the Main Show at the Convention Center are 10–13 February, but you'll want to get there well in advance of that to visit the satellite shows around town (more than forty), many of which open their doors in late January. The logistics of hitting all the not-to-be-missed stops? Mind-boggling. The total cost? Considerable. The Tucson experience? Priceless.

Minerals of California is the theme of the Main Show and will be carried out with an abundance of exhibits filled with colorful, gemmy California specimens (think tourmalines, kunzites, and aquamarines, to name a few); there will also be a symposium on the theme topic, cosponsored by the Tucson Gem and Mineral Society, the Mineralogical Society of America, and the Friends of Mineralogy. Then, as a remembrance of your visit, you'll want the California minerals show poster and, for the kids, a coloring book of California specimens. To whet your mineral appetite, we've filled this issue with lots of good information on California specimens and localities by some top-notch California (and other) authors.

MORE DATES TO CIRCLE: In addition to the Main Show, the Tucson experience encompasses a variety of other mineral opportunities, including the eighteenth annual Mineral Madness Sale and Family Fun Days at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum (2021 N. Kinney Rd., Tucson) on the weekend of 22–23 January. The sale will feature an array of minerals, gems, and fossils from around the world, with much of the material from Arizona and Mexico, along with jewelry-making demonstrations. In addition, there will be mineral-related activities for families all around the museum grounds.

The evening of Friday, 4 February, the University of Arizona's Flandrau Science Center opens its doors at 7 P.M. with an invitation-only reception that will feature an illustrated program by Dudley Blauwet and the unveiling of an exhibition titled Minerals of the War Zone. On display will be Afghanistan and Pakistan specimens from the collections of Herb Obodda, Dudley Blauwet, and Gene Meieran, as well as from the museum's Hubert de Monmonier collection. Thereafter the exhibit will be open to the public.

The weekend of 5–6 February Martin Zinn's Arizona Mineral and Fossil Show at the Hotel Tucson City Center (formerly the InnSuites), on Granada Street, will host a special Mineral and Lapidary Art Show and Reception in conjunction with their Gallery of Lapidary Artists. Also, the Friends of Mineralogy will have its annual general membership meeting and social at the hotel on 8 February, from 4–6 P.M.

On Saturday, 5 February, from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M., Dave Waisman's Westward Look Show, on Ina Road, will celebrate Collector's Day by featuring Wayne Sorensen, of Kellogg, Idaho, and the Wayne R. Sorensen Family Trust Collection in the lobby of the Westward Look Resort. Then on 6 February is the annual Sunday evening program at the Westward Look, this year with Dr. Federico Pezzotta, mineral curator at the Museum of Natural History in Milan, Italy, giving a presentation titled “Demantoid and Tourmaline Mineral Adventures in Madagascar.” The talk begins at 7:30 P.M. and is preceded by a social at 6:30.

LOOK FOR US: As last year, Rocks & Minerals will be in ballroom three at the Arizona Mineral and Fossil Show in the Hotel Tucson City Center from 29 January until we move to the Main Show, 10–13 February. On 6 February we will be set up at the Westward Look's Sunday evening program.

THE 2010 SALOTTI AWARD: The Seaman Mineral Museum Society made its twelfth annual presentation of the prestigious Dr. Charles A. Salotti Earth Science Education Award to John S. White, of Stewartstown, Pennsylvania, at the Tourmaline Ball fundraiser, held 2 October 2010, in Houghton, Michigan.

Caption: The 2010 Charles A. Salotti Award was presented to John S. White by Joanie Salotti-Craig of San Diego, Dr. Salotti's daughter.

Caption: The 2010 Charles A. Salotti Award was presented to John S. White by Joanie Salotti-Craig of San Diego, Dr. Salotti's daughter.

White earned a bachelor's degree in geology at Franklin and Marshall College and a master's degree in mineralogy from the University of Arizona. After working a short time as a field geologist, in 1963 he began a twenty-eight-year career at the Smithsonian Institution. He started as a museum technician/specialist in the Division of Mineralogy and then became curator in 1973 and associate curator-in-charge in 1981. In 1984 he was named curator-in-charge, a position he held until his retirement in 1991. Since then he has been a museum/collector consultant with Kustos (a company he founded with the late Joe Nagel) and has helped to develop and design new mineral galleries at several museums.

In 1970 White began an endeavor that would forever change and benefit the mineralogical community—both young and old, amateur and professional—by founding, editing, and publishing a new journal called the Mineralogical Record. He is the author of two books on popular mineralogy, more than 175 technical and popular articles, and sixteen book reviews. He has served as a consultant with the Discovery Channel, an editor of Mineralogical Almanac, and a consulting editor of Rocks & Minerals, for which he has been writing the provocative Let's Get It Right column for the past decade. He is a fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America and an honorary member of several mineral and gem societies.

The Seaman Mineral Museum Society welcomes nominations for the 2011 award. Nomination letters and supporting materials for nominees who have made significant contributions to earth science education should be sent to Dr. John Jaszczak, Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931-1295.

A RED-HOT FIND: Making news on the Internet this past fall was a find by the Adelaide Mining Company of world-class crocoite specimens in the “2010 Pocket” at the Adelaide mine in Dundas, Tasmania. Although a few of these specimens were offered for sale at the recent Munich Show (29–31 October), most will be making their debut at the upcoming Tucson Show, according to mine owner Adam Wright. You can see them in the Adelaide Mining Company's room (number 241) at Martin Zinn's Arizona Mineral and Fossil Show at the Hotel Tucson City Center. For those who just can't wait until then, we've pictured a couple of the pieces here. They can also be seen on website www.theadelaidemine.com.

Approximately 350 collector-grade specimens were recovered from the 2010 Pocket, not counting the loose single crystals found in the detritus at the bottom of the pocket.

Caption: One of the specimens from the 2010 Pocket, this one measuring 19 cm high and 13.5 cm across. The specimen has a thin gibbsite crust coating the smaller, lustrous crocoite crystals on the back.

Caption: One of the specimens from the 2010 Pocket, this one measuring 19 cm high and 13.5 cm across. The specimen has a thin gibbsite crust coating the smaller, lustrous crocoite crystals on the back.

Caption: Another of the crocoite specimens found in the 2010 Pocket at the Adelaide mine. It is 16.5 cm across and 11.25 cm high, with the largest crystal 10 cm long.

Caption: Another of the crocoite specimens found in the 2010 Pocket at the Adelaide mine. It is 16.5 cm across and 11.25 cm high, with the largest crystal 10 cm long.

TURNING THE OTHER CHEEK: Face painting in The Vug's booth at the September Denver Show gave a whole new meaning to the phrase “mineral face.” Kids, and even some adults (see photo), could choose a design from ten different options to have reproduced, free of charge, on their faces by mineral artist Brandy Naugle. When the waiting lines got too long, Justin Zzyzx grabbed a paintbrush and helped out. Judging from the kids who passed by the Rocks & Minerals booth, diamonds and dinosaurs were the hot images to sport.

Caption: Rocks & Minerals consulting editor Mark Mauthner holding still for mineral artist Brandy Naugle at the 2010 Denver Show.

Caption: Rocks & Minerals consulting editor Mark Mauthner holding still for mineral artist Brandy Naugle at the 2010 Denver Show.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: The Houston Gem and Mineral Society, in memory of Arthur E. Smith, and the Cincinnati Mineral Society underwrote color costs in the Connoisseur's Choice column; Maryann and John Fender (Fender Natural Resources) did the same for the Museum Notes column; and donors to the Color Fund contributed to color in the remaining articles. All are thanked for their generosity in partnering with Rocks & Minerals to support color photography in the magazine.

M.E.H.

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